Spool’s Out: Cassette Reviews / Kitty Wang

Tristan Bath has included a review of Kitty Wang’s debut release over at the Quietus‘ monthly cassette tape review section.

Link: SPOOL’S OUT.

Text:

Okay, so the idea of a modular synth album made in a planned out process by two guys called Phil and Barry might not sound so exciting. But hear me out.

Kitty Wang is a duo comprising Barry Cullen, “noise enthusiast based in Belfast”, and Phil Porter, “an audio worker based in Munich”, and from the sounds of it they’re both pretty well versed in the technical aspects of playing oscillators and modulators. This music was somewhat more ‘designed’ than ‘composed’, the process designed under the influence of remixing as a means to make music.

The duo’s original modular jams were “cut and arranged into clocked patterns on a computer”, then broken into fragments which were played back through the modular system, then “clocked by pulses from the original arrangement”, then… Okay I’m losing you.

Essentially, the duo arranged and rearranged various improvisations methodically, and while the untrained ear won’t most likely pick out the minutiae of ‘what happened’, the result elevates the work beyond your average synth bro down. The synths cough and splutter at times, such as on the catchily titled ‘kw6b2(moments)v2.2’, death rattling atop a rinsed out lattice of droning modules and rhythmic whirrs puncturing through thing envelope veils. It may have all been made with plenty of premeditation, but Kitty Wang feels like the work of a ghost in the machine, spluttering computer music out in bizarre alien shapes, occasionally stepping into briefly droning chords or stomped out marches.”

 

Interzone – Catalyst Arts 24/05 – 05/07/18

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INTERZONE @ Catalyst Arts, Belfast

24th May – 5th July 2018

Barry Cullen | Jonny McEwen  | Una Monaghan | Saul Rayson  | Susannah Stark

Interzone brings together a group of internationally prominent and emergent artists whose approaches to their individual art practices embrace sound, installation and visual components. The project is a six week conversation, the gallery re-imagined as liminal land between borders, playing host to a sustained exploration of the multi-faceted, complex, mutually invigorating relationships possible across visual and sonic art practices and rejecting outmoded separation between disciplines within contemporary art. Codes, glitches and loops permeate the assembled constituents of the exhibition, instigating a shifting inter-connection between what is seen and heard. The title references both the International Zone setting of William S Burroughs taboo breaking 1959 novel Naked Lunch and the mysterious, dreamlike “Zone” in Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 film Stalker.

Interzone will be complemented by a series of live Sonic Art performances on the opening night and to coincide with June and July Late Night Art Belfast.